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The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  Caducus  1 Feb 10 4:27AM Thread Closed

Upon researching David Wevill's poetry I saw a link that Nicholas Hughes hung himself in March 2009, a brilliant marine biologist I was deeply saddened.

Those wolves that sang their grief for Slyvia Plath must be howling again.

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  OldShoe  1 Feb 10 8:35AM Thread Closed

There was some stir about it shortly after reports of the suicide hit the public channels.  Some "Cursed Family" type comments, etc.  

Many of the reports from family/friends stated that Nicholas became deeply depressed after the passing of his father and started to separate himself socially.  Appeared to those making the reports that he was unable to re-adapt.

I accidentally happened upon some articles on the matter back in March.  

One thing is certain.  The Hughes family has definitely seen their share of life and death, and the hardships of either.

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  R_Reid_Welch  1 Feb 10 9:45AM Thread Closed

It saddens me most to read these things when, in my natural ignorance of the peron or his./her family, there's also all lack to any such thing as a copy/pasted LINK.


I would be such a help.


Noting that poet types such a Plath, and that Lew Welch (but not myself ( are prone to clincical depression.

Poets, perhaps more than any other kind, seem to feel that the world is after them, personally, in some way...they are too tender to take the heat.  I know that I'm that way.

I do not know Ted Hughes nor his son.  That's my ignorance.  But no-one sent me a flower of sympathy after I buried my own dad with my own hands. My own brother did not help, but to put the body into the casket, then he cut out.

So I have a hard time with loss.   I have a harder time with hard, really hard people.

There's a kid in Mass who I hope today is feeling a little more about the other guy.
I have not "one"d his poetry nor called his work, "this is shit".

I hope he thinks about the Hughes family....which may be abstract to myself, but, really: if I knew of them personally, I'd care more.   One reason I will not get too close to anyone unstable, is that they tend to die.  And that hurts, always.

About a million people, nice people, died yesterday (to make up a number. None of them are known to me. If any of them were known, I'd be in special grief that would kill me for sure.

It's natural for humans to abstract the loss...to distance themselves from others.

The HIV epidemic of the early eighties through the nineties, sort of made me "death proof". It's like war: the shear numbers of lives cut off, by =biology=, cause a hardening of the heart.  If not for that, the, yourself commits to the suicide plan.

I hope little S is feeling himself today and understands that the world does not much care for either one of us.  Too bad I'm shit.   Shit that talks back.

A LINK to the news story of Hughes' son would be APPRECIATED.

Thanks,
r.

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  R_Reid_Welch  1 Feb 10 10:04AM Thread Closed

I want to apologize, Caducus. I apologize; I forgot to thank you for the news, but, repeat request for a link of any sort.  

It's a common name, and so, a link would be a help.

Small consolation: the dead should not be mourned, yes?
It's the survivors we should care about.

George Stephenson died.   All know him.  He was a hero to me.
Nobody seems to care, though, great man he was.  Why?

http://inventors.about.com/od/sstartinventors/a/Stephenson.htm

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  OldShoe  1 Feb 10 11:42AM Thread Closed

I am glad that Caducus didn't post a link.  I don't believe it is necessary for links to be posted on everything, and sometimes I feel it is detracting from whatever may be the discussion at a given time, as though it requires some sort of verification.

Just as easy for those who want to find out more to open a browser and run a Google search.  In most cases, I feel that is even better as it can lead to people finding more about a discussion topic or issue than just what is offered via a single link.   It is an education of interests.  If the interest is there, then there is certainly means via the web to educate oneself on the topic.

I feel that if one were to perceive tragedy within the death-events of the family history, it can be found under the shadow of those socio-manic Plath “wolves” that spent years haunting the Hughes family about Sylvia’s suicide.  

This probably loomed over Ted and Assia Wevill, the woman Ted had an affair with while married to Sylvia and held a relationship with thereafter her death.  Perhaps this is what led to Assia Wevill committing suicide in the same exact manner as Plath, taking with her, Alexandra Tatiana Elise, her 4 year old daughter from the relationship with Ted Hughes.  

[History repeats itself/perpetuates itself...]

The relationship between Assia Wevill and Ted Hughes pretty much entails as to how Caducus ran into the story of Nicholas Hughes death, in the roundabout way by doing research on David Wevill, the husband of Assia Wevill.

So, although I am not affected directly by any of this and feel no sense of immediate loss, I found the history quite interesting to read into.  This in itself implies why the public gets so involved, and why the family has a difficult time escaping their history in a sense.  It is self perpetuating.

People die.  That is a given.  People commit suicide.  People mourn personal loss.  However, it isn’t so common for the survivors, both family and friends, to have to be engaged publicly about it, time and time again.  One would think that would certainly mess with the mourning process.  The weight of it must fall heavily on Frieda and surviving family.  

In how Caducus expressed sorrow over the subject, it would appear that the sentiments are in notion to the grief the family must feel over the matter, in relation to the weight of the historic shadow that looms over them and which they are haunted by via public scrutiny and exposure.

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  R_Reid_Welch  1 Feb 10 12:20PM Thread Closed

^

Well put. OK, I can agree with all that you just wrote.

Links are helpful to me, so that I can see, instantly just what terrible things
some person or persons were/are saying to devil those survivors.

-----on a brighter note!  (jk).   I smoke.  Literally.  I mean (humour coming)....

I smoke because three days ago a BIC brand lighter exploded in my face,
minor burns. My upper lip looks like....a miniature version of The Hindenburg's wreckage.

It's not that bad, but, the fireball of about two seconds duration was just like that disaster.

Glad I was the only one affected!  But there are millions of these lighters sold every week.

It's like: I attract disaster.  I hope Sylvia Plath's casket does not next fall from a fifth story window, to the sidewalk, while I'm on some stroll or other.    

Tisket a basket...case,r.


(thanks OS!)

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  Liliana  1 Feb 10 3:34PM Thread Closed

Well it was indeed a 'wolf moon' the other night.

http://www.techjackal.net/space/2010/01/30/wolfs-moon-makes-amate ur-astronomers-howl-with-delight/

re: The recent death of Ted Hughes Son  Caducus  2 Feb 10 1:11AM Thread Closed

Some links are out there with the obvious keyword searcheson youtube and google. I never posted a link - dont know why maybe out of respect.

What particulalry moved me about your reply is the comment about survivors, David Wevill a brilliant poet in his own right had his talent overshadowed by the affair Ted Hughes had with his wife which effectively drove both Assia and Sylvia to suicide. Assia even took the daughter - Shura's life with her own.

In context the gift of poetry that Ted Hughes gave the world came at a price - Sylvia Plath dead, Assia Wevill dead, their daughter Shura - dead and Nicholas Hughes - dead.

An intensely private man Ted Hughes spoke lovingly and publicly of his son Nicholas and of Frieda (his kids with plath), his son adored his father and missed him, the speculation is that Nicholas much like his mum (and many of us) was prone to an apex of depression that became unbearable.

I am more saddened for Nicholas Hughes, Assia Wevill, Shura, Frieda, and those who took the brunt of the aftermath - David Wevill who I've just discovered who is a beautiful and largely unheralded poet deserves what he has written of recognised.

Your comment about your losses are tender, all I can say is I do think the dead need to grieved for because so few of us actually really know the core of our souls and to not celebrate that honestly makes them truly dead.

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