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Humorist odes Humourist (with audio reading)
netskyIam

H.o.H.
 1
 
 
Am I old, Father Lewis, at fifty two,
 2
Though my appearance belies worn joints?
 3
"Do you henna your hair; nip-tuck anywhere?"
 4
I do not, but liars may swear
 5
 
 
I am old. Father Lewis, at fifty two,
 6
Though my demeanor is near to the child....
 7
"Do you read Harry Potter, or colour a book?"
 8
I do not.      And I'm too old to hook.
 9
 
 
I am young, Father Lewis, at fifty two,
 10
Though my body and mind will apart.
 11
"Do you favour a tonic, or any drug when...."
 12
I do—as may pass through your pen.
 13
 
 
"I do, as to pass through your pen."
 14

22 Feb 07

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http://poetry.tetto.o rg/~netskyIam/
(photo)
 — netskyIam

I refuse to believe that you are 52.  32, maybe, but 52?  That's insane!

The poem, however, is vital and young and I can empathize, except for those joints...ouch.

Imc
 — Isabelle5

Hi Isabelle, Thanks.  I'll be fifty three in May, ouch.  
Yeah, joints are all hurting, hands in particular.  
Wake up feeling sore and stiff, that's what aging is doing so far that I can feel.  
Brain works better though, and sex drive and ability is same as ever,  
but I should'a died decades ago in the first wave of the HIV epidemic.
I made it through alive and uninfected.  So I like to celebrate that,
but also remind myself of the temporary leasehold here.  Thanks,
reidy
 — netskyIam

trial reading
http://tinyurl.com/2m67le< br />

thanks, r.
 — netskyIam

this really bugs me...

i haven't speakers on this gizmoid.

(and i'm gettin' sick of your pictures. why noy change them?)
 — chuckles

Humorist odes Humourist (retitle)  

I fail to see the humor nor the significance of this title, the last two words are spelled incorrectly.

H.o.H.
    
Again, I fail to see the significance of this.

Am I old, Father Lewis, at fifty two,

I hope Father Lewis is a priest, otherwise I don’t get it.

Though my appearance belies worn joints?

No cap on Though and no question mark.

"Do you henna your hair; nip-tuck anywhere?"

Hopefully a priest would not be asking this question, but this is what is inferred.

I do not, but liars may swear

This is just not a good line. Rearranging a sentence does not a line of poetry make, or something like that – lol – I borders on nonsensical.
    
I am old. Father Lewis, at fifty two,

Don’t tell me I’m old either. 50’s should be the pinnacle of one’s existence.  

Though my demeanor is near to the child....

Here you are correct.

"Do you read Harry Potter, or colour a book?"

You’re an American, spell like one! Color.

I do not.      And I'm too old to hook.

Please don’t put unnecessary white space and a capitalized ‘And’, are you 14? Don’t answer that. To hook, good grief Charlie Brown, it could mean anything; ride a wave on a surfboard? A dance?
    
I am young, Father Lewis, at fifty two,

You got that right.

Though my body and mind will apart.

Excuse me, ‘will apart’, good grief Charlie Brown.

"Do you favour a tonic, or any drug when...."

favor, you Old World wannabe.

I do—as may pass through your pen.

The elixir of poetry is as a tonic or drug. That is what comes to mind, hopefully that is what you meant, for I like it.

"I do, as to pass through your pen."

A rather self-indulgent poem, you are stuck on yourself; it’s not a bad thing though. I enjoyed the poem for the healing quality of poetry to distressed aging joints.

A side note: You could be the brother of a gay relative that I have from your earlier pictures. He still looks much like you but now is, I think, taller and aging more. I guess he is about 40, he lives with his boyfriend and they both have AIDS. The ironic thing is that he is a nurse. I am not implying that gays look alike – lol – I’m saying I thought the pictures were of him, truly.
 — Fallen

humour is not spelt incorrectly - it is spelled in the original anglo-saxon english version

and if as an american he chooses to use the correct etymological structure of the word 'colour' then so be it - shows he has some understanding :)

why would a priest not be asking human questions of a visual nature?

to limit is to kill - to not understand license of poetry - language is free to be twisted and altered and placed in ways that makes no apparent sense on the surface - but such is poetry
 — Mongrol

Hi Mongrol and Fallen.   It required that the reader is a reader of poetry by the masters.
The "Father Lewis" is Lewis Carrol.  I am American, so I spell it "humor". But in "channelling" (imaginary!) with my soul-friend of a past era, I respect him by using his spellings.  

If I reprint "Father William", you'll see that my form is an ODE to my favorite personality and intellect in English letters.   Carroll is a lovable man, and he has given so much joy.

Fallen, I thank you for critting the poem.

-----Here is my audio reading of my poem -for Carroll-
Of course, I can't do an authentic accent, but...

http://tinyurl.com/2m67le< br />
and here in bold is his springboard,
which I do not copy so closely in my item;

to make the genesis clear:



FATHER WILLIAM
Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

"YOU are old, Father William," the young man said,
"And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on your head--
Do you think, at your age, it is right?"

"In my youth," Father William replied to his son,
"I feared it might injure the brain;
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none,
Why, I do it again and again."

"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before,
And have grown most uncommonly fat;
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door--
Pray, what is the reason of that?"

"In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his gray locks,
"I kept all my limbs very supple
By the use of this ointment -- one shilling the box --
Allow me to sell you a couple?"

"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak--
Pray, how did you manage to do it?"

"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength which it gave to my jaw
Has lasted the rest of my life."

"You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose
That your eye was as steady as ever;
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose--
What made you so awfully clever?"

"I have answered three questions, and that is enough,"
Said his father; "don't give yourself airs!
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff?
Be off, or I'll kick you down-stairs!"

 — netskyIam

thank you for the full elaboration Netsky - my comments were more directed towards Fallen - but your completion of the picture you have made here is appreciated never the less :)

to me your form and poem works well as it is - and L. Carroll as anyone who knows him well will know that he was a master of the nonsense verse - a puzzler and a mathematical conundrum maker ;) - and so to adopt the verse into parody makes perfect sense to me

'curioser and curioser'

-Mong-
 — Mongrol

Thanks!  The funny thing about nonsense verse is that its construction requires a perfect grasp of both logic and sane thought; both of which were possessed in fullest degree by imagination master, Charles Dodson.
He is alive forever, caring for children, by his words of good works.
 — netskyIam

All I can say netsky is that I spoke from the heart. I know next to nothing of Lewis Carroll, go ask Alice, she will tell you the same.

Mongrol, even though I don't know this person has hurt me deeply, a bad day I guess, a very bad day.

Cheers
 — Fallen

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