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digging into the ham 8=========D
OKcomputer

a miserable life
 1
made up from sexual frustrations, built up high enough
 2
to form buildings, cities, civilizations.
 3
 
 
the people are blue and swollen; they
 4
are so tired, they collapse;
 5
the buildings are so high above the people,
 6
they are lonesome, they collapse; the sky
 7
comes down low enough that
 8
people can't breathe, it is
 9
too heavy. some
 10
 
 
people have guns some
 11
 
 
people climb onto the dinner table
 12
to grope the sunday ham
 13
dead and dumb
 14
but it substitutes honestly. i do not have
 15
you.
 16
 
 
let's admit
 17
we do not have eachother; we are alone;
 18
we would like to die
 19
choking from the sky, everything is so low,
 20
everybody is so
 21
terribly heavy it's not worth it.
 22
 
 
combing through the crowds
 23
for a numbing mechanism.
 24
there is no more love. let's die.
 25

5 Jun 07

Rated 10 (7.7) by 1 users.
Active (1):
Inactive (10): 1, 3, 5, 5, 6, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10

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(88 more poems by this author)

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Comments:

i too hate ham, but i love your linebreaks and how everything mashes slowly down the page like rotting meat down a windshield. this seems a bit narrow in its focus on mere sexuality; it feels like it could apply to so much else which in turn sexualizes everything from the poem's perspective.

yeah, good work.
 — Virgil

i love the cock in the title
my friend calls a swollen, sloppy, been-around-too-many-blocks-too-many-times vagina
a ham sandwich
 — unknown

I really dig the poem,
you are hilarious.
 — jenakajoffer

12 - 16 are genius.
 — jumpoline

hey,

i think it might be better this way.

justin.

//life//  

sexual frustrations, built up high enough  
to form buildings, cities, civilizations.  
    
the people are blue and swollen; they  
are so tired, they collapse;  
the buildings are so high above the people,  
they are lonesome, they collapse; the sky  
comes down low enough that  
people can't breathe, it is  
too heavy. some  
    
people have guns some  
    
climb onto the dinner table  
grope the sunday ham  
dead and dumb  
but it substitutes honestly. i do not have  
you.  
    
let's admit  
we do not have eachother; we are alone;  
we would like to die  
choking from the sky, everything is so low,  
everybody is so  
terribly heavy.


    
 — unknown

Geez,
building up, collapsing, climbing across tables for ham, and dying- what more can we ask for in a 25-line poem? This is fantastic.
 — JD

thumbs up
 — gnormal

eachother is so far not a word in the English dictionary, besides that a very weird and strange poem...I like it...although I struggle to remain afloat from the depths of hell. Cheers
 — unknown

the english dictionary is far from my master. ;) thanks for your comments
 — OKcomputer

If I told you that I hated it, would you care or just pretend that you didn't read my comment?

Some day maybe you'll understand...
 — unknown

This sounds like a bit of narration at the beginning of a documentary.
 — shoes

I don't understand your question. I would care. :)

I am just really particular about which criticisms I take to heart. It's my artwork, afterall.
 — OKcomputer

Unique!  Clever/smart.  And humorous... But I wouldn't say it has any other identifiable effect.  

But maybe I just feel left out.  :P
 — Infrangible

It makes sense. Read it again.
 — OKcomputer

+ thx for teh coments
 — OKcomputer

this is adolescent pure garbage, but it gave me a muse for a poem of mine, so thanks (i'm a creative writing professor at Iowa).
 — unknown

alright, let's just call my poem pure adolescent crap and then covet it. sounds like denial.
 — OKcomputer

This is deafeningly exact; scarily so,
Yep, you did it: you wrote a good poem!
 — unknown

powerful
 — poetbill

I love the idea of groping the Sunday ham.  Lines 12-16 are winners, but the rest of the poem is whining.  Although "adolescent pure garbage" is harsh, I see a spec of truth in the insult.  Why not make it a surreal poem with a real twist of pain and poignancy at the end? Just some thoughts.  You could start with the excellent stanza of ham-groping.

Lucy, who does not grope hams, lambs or any other cooked farm animals
 — mnemosyne

changed my mind
 — poetbill

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